Best Kind of Lost

Best Kind of Lost

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We’re Going to Uruguay?

by Dave
March 30 – 31

 

Colonia busker copyTalk about unexpected stops. At no point ever did we anticipate exploring this small South American country tucked between Brazil and Argentina on the continent’s Atlantic coast, but there we were. Due to a random flight search that revealed an unbeatable fare from Montevideo (the capital of Uruguay, but you already knew that…) to Lima, we worked in two days in Uruguay on the tail end of our Argentinian exploration.

After a quick ferry from Buenos Aires, we settled in for 36 hours in the UNESCO World Heritage site city of Colonia del Sacramento, more commonly just called Colonia.

Colonia has a mild humid subtropical climate, which means it rains a lot. Exhibit A.

Colonia has a mild humid subtropical climate, which means it rains a lot. Exhibit A. (EDITOR’S NOTE: No, Dave has not preternaturally gained his well-earned gut two decades early. That’s just our small backpack containing all our electronics. Because ALWAYS SAVE THE BACKPACK.)

The city sits in the southwest corner of Uruguay, facing Buenos Aires across the Río de la Plata.

The city sits in the southwest corner of Uruguay, facing Buenos Aires across the Río de la Plata.

Colorful cobblestone streets and squares, old architecture, cafes and local food (namely Chivito, a heart attack waiting to happen on an overflowing plate) filled up our day and a half in this charmer before we hopped a bus to Montevideo for our flight out of the country.

The country's signature dish, chivito (so expect to pay top dolla for it). As good as it looks.

The country’s signature dish, chivito (so expect to pay top dolla for it). As good as it looks.

Spending the rainy day reading at cozy Ganache cafe.

Spending the rainy day reading at cozy Ganache cafe.

Live music and delicious food at El Drugstore, a popular restaurant in town. Naturally, we had chavito.

Live music and delicious food at El Drugstore, a popular restaurant in town. Naturally, we had chivito.

Along with the similarly overpriced signature Uruguayan drink, Medio y Medio, a sparkling wine comprised of moscato grapes and pinot blanc.

Along with the similarly overpriced signature Uruguayan drink, Medio y Medio, a sparkling wine comprised of moscato grapes and pinot blanc. A must, according to Noelle.

Uruguay Cat does not approve of our short stay.

Uruguay Cat does not approve of our short stay. Uruguay Cat sits in judgement.

And now we can say we’ve been to Uruguay. So we’ve got that going for us. Which is nice.

An atmospheric streets in the Barrio Histórico (historic quarter).

An atmospheric street in the Barrio Histórico (the historic quarter, built by the Portuguese).

The Barrio Histórico was originally enclosed by a fortification wall, but most of it was removed in the late 1700's. One of the town’s most prominent landmarks, Colonia’s 19th-century lighthouse provides an excellent view of the old town.

The Barrio Histórico was originally enclosed by a fortification wall, but most of it was removed in the late 1700’s. Colonia’s 19th-century lighthouse, one of the town’s most prominent landmarks, provides an excellent view of the old town.

The rain let up our second day so we were able to fully appreciate the walkability of the little town.

The rain let up our second day so we were able to fully appreciate the walkability of the town and the charm of the irregular terrain-accomodating street plan in the historic quarter.

The newer, Spanish area outside the historical section of the city is marked by wider streets.

The newer, Spanish area outside the historical section of the city is marked by wider streets.

Portón de Campo – the City Gate and wooden drawbridge.

Portón de Campo – the original City Gate and wooden drawbridge.

 Colonia's "Street of Sighs," an 18th-century mossy-stoned passageway, lined with ochre and russet stucco buildings.

Colonia’s “Street of Sighs,” an 18th-century mossy-stoned passageway, lined with russet and gold ombre stucco buildings.

The town has an interesting fascination with vintage cars. You'll find them parked (aka on display) on the cobblestone streets throughout the city.

The town has an interesting fascination with vintage cars. You’ll find them “casually parked” (aka on display) on the cobblestone streets throughout the city.

See!?

See!?

It's been real, Uruguay.

It’s been real, Uruguay.

 

What do you think?

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